At the Taylor Museum/FAC for the Firmament exhibition with my publisher, George F. Thompson, 2013

In the studio, finishing framing for The Monolith Project, 2015

I received my BFA from the Pacific Northwest College of Art in printmaking and photography in 1992.   Between summer stints as a hiking guide in Colorado, and regular forays into the Columbia River Gorge in Oregon while in school, I developed an early passion for the intersection between art and land. 

It took many more years for me to slowly come to terms with the fact that I did not want to inform my images with a political subtext in the tradition of the New Topographics photographers.  Neither did I want to make photographs of land derived from the highly Formalist concerns of Modernism.  Instead, I have slowly found my voice through the study of cosmology, making art that addresses our place in the universe, aspiring to provide a poetic response to the “big questions.”  My appointment as a Fulbright Fellow in Jerusalem over the turn of the millennium played a critical role in this development.  Artists such as Bill Viola, James Turrell, Anselm Kiefer and Wolfgang Laib have been profound influences that have helped me to articulate a more contemplative response to the world.  Literature has played an equally important role in my artistic development: the works of Barry Lopez, Marilynne Robinson, W.S. Merwin, Mary Oliver, Marguerite Yourcenar, and John Berger have all been touchstones for me over the last two decades.

In 2004 I went back to school, completing an MA in Aesthetic Theory at Prescott College.  Studying the intersection between ecology, theology, and aesthetics, my goal was to hone the philosophical tools I would need to move my creative practice forward, while deepening my dedication to the classroom.  I serve as the Visual Arts Department Chair at St. Mary’s Academy in Englewood, Colorado, where I teach aesthetics, photography, works on paper and the illustrated book.

In recent years I have devoted much of my creative practice to the design and construction of artist’s books, some of which have been placed in the Special Collections Departments at both the Penrose Library at the University of Denver and the Norlin Library at the University of Colorado, Boulder.  Two of these books, The Lost Christmas Gift and Firmament, have been acquired by enthusiastic publishers (Princeton Architectural Press and GFT Publishing) who have helped to bring my work to a much wider audience. In the fall of 2013, my first solo museum exhibition was installed in the Taylor Museum at the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center. The FAC has since acquired the exhibition of 48 photographs for its permanent collection, through a generous gift from the American Land Publishing Project. My creative practice continues to thrive, and I am deeply appreciative to the people and institutions that have been so supportive of my work.